• Phil

My X is Forked. What Should I Do?




Yours is a shoulder injury, but I believe these ideas can be applied to most broken bits.


If you can keep moving, keep moving. I can see from your question that this isn’t your first rodeo. “How to work around it” implies that you are already aware that a complete training hiatus is rarely the way to go. Consistent exercise keeps the system strong, which will protect from future injuries. It’s no good letting your shoulder heal if the rest of your body begins to decay. With that being said…


Sometimes, it is right to stop. There are a number of injuries that require a complete break, and a bright green light from a medical specialist before continuing. Spines, brains, hearts, necks – If the injury falls into one of these camps, please make the effort to find out the exact cause, and the correct steps to rehab. If you don’t have one of the BIG injuries…


Put gentle force through the injury. When something goes pop, the muscles behave like a startled hedgehog, locking up to protect against additional damage. We then have pain from the injury, and an additional ache in the surrounding area. This is when you are most likely to stop all movement there. I think this is a mistake. In most cases, as long as the intensity is correct, movement is medicine, because movement encourages the muscles to relax their grip. Blood is allowed back into the area, reducing inflammation, and allowing the process of healing. Rubber bands are great for injured shoulders, as they allow you to put gentle resistance into the area through many planes of motion. Here are some examples of exercises you should try. If you don’t have a band, take a very light dumbbell and copy the movements. The goal is to move the shoulder in a wide variety of ways. A dull ache is fine, but remember…


Avoid anything that cause sharp pain. Pain is the body’s larynx. A dull, bearable pain is the body saying “look mate, I’m injured,” and a sharp, shooting pain is the body screaming “stop it you f*cking w*nker.” I would definitely advise you to…


Cut out the heavy weights. Human tissue has a limit to the amount of force it can withstand. It’s highly likely you got injured because you subjected a muscle or joint to an excessive level of force. The heavier the weights, the more force you impart, which is why I would advise you to cut them out until your shoulder is completely healed. A question that comes up often, is…


Should you get a physio? When a human being is out of shape, their first action is to buy a gym membership. When you want to see how good a Personal Trainer is, you look at his qualifications. When your body breaks, you go to a physio. What do the above 3 examples have in common? They all represent convention. This is what you are supposed to do. But the other interesting commonality is that they rarely ever work. Gym memberships are worthless without hard work, PT qualifications are multiple choice memory tests, and physios… dear oh dear, physios. This isn’t the right blog, so I will simply say that I’ve seen tens of physios in my time – the majority coming with glowing recommendations – and none of them have ever fixed me. What they all did with 100% consistency, is take my money. There must be some good ones out there, but they are FEW AND FAR BETWEEN. In my opinion, and it should be noted that it is just an opinion, most small joint and muscular injuries can be healed to the same standard, and in the same time frame, with the ideas in this blog. One such idea is…


Make sure you’re getting plenty of sleep. When you get unconscious, you plug your body in to the charging port. Sleep is the only time your body truly heals, so the more time you spend in deep, natural sleep, the faster your maladies will reset. Some bad news…


The older you are, the longer it takes to heal. When you’re 16 years old, you can break your leg and hit a PB in your squats the next day. With each passing year, that relationship between injury and healing time becomes a little more depressing. One week in my teens, is now twelve in my thirties. Pablito, add your tender age, to the fact that shoulder injuries are stubborn, and you’re likely looking at a good long wait. You must exercise real patience, because…


Stress doesn’t heal sh*t. Accepting what is, and finding a way to keep moving, whilst performing light rehab on your shoulder, is far superior than getting your Calvins in a twist over something you can do nothing about.


If there’s no change, find a specialist. On very rare occasions, the body can’t find the answer. If you’ve been incredibly patient and you’re seeing no change, perhaps it’s time to seek out a specialist. Go with an open mind – see if they can throw any light on the problem. I am staunchly anti-surgery, and I think here in the UAE, docs are far too quick to wield the scalpel, but in some circumstances, it is the right thing to do. I would do everything in my power to avoid it though, including figuring out if I could live with the injury. Definitely exhaust every single option before you consider any actions that could have permanent negative ramifications.


Wishing you a speedy recovery old boy.


Phil x

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